Bunkai Kanku Dai

This is a summary of some of the practical and effective applications within the kata Kanku Dai (Kushanku). Kata is alway more interesting to practice when you actually know some realistic applications behind the techniques. Sensei David Gimbeline hopes you can use these ideas in your own training and teaching.

When karate was introduced from Okinawa to mainland Japan, its curriculum was modified to be more suitable for teaching in large group settings. In the case of kata, explanation of the brutal self-defense applications behind the movements were mostly removed from the teaching. These applications have remained largely a secret to most karateka for nearly a century.

Kanku Dai (Shotokan)

bassai.gif.pngKūshankū (クーシャンク, 公相君) or Kankū-dai (観空大), is an open hand karate kata that is studied by many practitioners of Okinawan Karate. In many karate styles, there are two versions of the kata: Kūsankū-shō and Kūsankū-dai. The name Kūsankū or Kōsōkun (公相君) is used in Okinawan systems of karate, and refers to a person by the name of Kūsankū, a Chinese diplomat from Fukien. (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kusanku_(kata))

Kata

Embusen

kanku-dai

Bunkai